Traditional Wood Burning Stoves- Old fashioned or Making a Comeback Over Electric Stoves?

Wood or multi fuel burning stoves have recently arrived on the home heating scene and have been hailed as the new modern and environmentally friendly way of keeping a house warm and cosy, although electric stoves are very popular still. There is no doubt these stoves can be a very attractive addition to a living area in a home. People are drawn to having a warm flickering fire to gather around, and one of the most popular of these stoves is the wood burning variety.


By installing a wood burning stove in their homes, many people believe they are taking a step into the future, when in fact they are taking a step back into the past. Our ancestors were burning wood thousands of years ago, well before the discovery of coal, gas and oil, first in primitive fires then later in fire places and finally wood burning stoves.


I remember a wood burning stove in my father’s picture frame making shop. It stood in the centre of the work shop, with a metal flue rising straight up into the ceiling. However, this stove was far from the friendly, glowing fire that sits in the homes of many people, but a squat circular tube that was fed by way of a small door close to the floor. I am sure that wood was not the only material used to feed the flames.
This was not a stove anyone would want in their living room or kitchen.

Why are people turning to Wood burning Stoves?
The reason many people have turned to wood as a fuel, is mainly concern of supply and the cost of the more traditional fuels. In the last severe winter here in the United Kingdom, many of those who depended on oil for their home heating found supplies disrupted and prices rising alarmingly. Others, who depend on gas and electricity, have been worried about the constant upward pressure on prices, although these seems to have been reversed lately, but for how long remains to be seen.


There is the belief that wood, as a fuel, is cheap and plentiful. This may be true for those living in rural areas where there is plenty of wood to be found lying on the ground, but people living in urban areas are not finding fuel as easy to come by, and is, in some cases far from cheap. Those who have access to plenty of wood are discovering they need an area to store and dry it to make it suitable for burning in their stoves.
Urban dwellers with wood burning stoves are finding buying wood dried and prepared for burning, expensive.


People love the warm glow of a fire.
However, despite these setbacks people are still turning to wood and multi fuel burning stoves, as opposed to the more traditional methods of home heating. The lure of a cosy warm glow coming from the modern stylish and attractive stove is becoming hard to resist.


So, when people settle quietly and warmly in front of their fire, many are unaware they are warming themselves in the same way our ancestors did many years ago.


Wood burning stoves may appear to be the latest and chic way of heating our home, but the truth is, burning wood to keep us warm and protected from the cold, is as old as the hills.